Here are some of the statistics from the Migration Policy Institute:  According to the Census Bureau’s 2010 American Community Survey (ACS), the US immigrant population stood at almost 40 million, or 13 percent of the total US population of 309.3 million. As of 2010, Mexican-born immigrants accounted for approximately 29 percent of the nearly 40 million foreign born residing in the United States, making them the largest immigrant group in the country by far. China (including Hong Kong but not Taiwan) accounted for 5 percent of all foreign born, followed by India and the Philippines, each comprising approximately 4 percent of the immigrant population. These four countries — together with Vietnam, El Salvador, Cuba, and Korea (at about 3 percent each), as well as the Dominican Republic and Guatemala (each about 2 percent) — made up almost 60 percent of all foreign born residing in the United States in 2010. Of the 40 million foreign born in the United States in 2010, 38 percent entered the country prior to 1990, 27 percent entered between 1990 and 1999, and almost 35 percent entered in 2000 or later. The majority of Hispanics in the United States are native-born US citizens. Of the 50.7 million people in 2010 who identified themselves as having Hispanic or Latino ancestry, only 37 percent (18.8 million) were immigrants.  In 2010, 73,293 refugees were admitted to the United States, marking a roughly 2 percent decrease from 2009 (74,602). Iraq, Burma, and Bhutan were the primary countries of nationality for refugees admitted to the United States in both 2009 and 2010, representing nearly 64 percent (47,072) of all refugees admitted in 2010.  For more information visit the link.

Here are some of the statistics from the Migration Policy Institute:  According to the Census Bureau’s 2010 American Community Survey (ACS), the US immigrant population stood at almost 40 million, or 13 percent of the total US population of 309.3 million. As of 2010, Mexican-born immigrants accounted for approximately 29 percent of the nearly 40 million foreign born residing in the United States, making them the largest immigrant group in the country by far. China (including Hong Kong but not Taiwan) accounted for 5 percent of all foreign born, followed by India and the Philippines, each comprising approximately 4 percent of the immigrant population. These four countries — together with Vietnam, El Salvador, Cuba, and Korea (at about 3 percent each), as well as the Dominican Republic and Guatemala (each about 2 percent) — made up almost 60 percent of all foreign born residing in the United States in 2010. Of the 40 million foreign born in the United States in 2010, 38 percent entered the country prior to 1990, 27 percent entered between 1990 and 1999, and almost 35 percent entered in 2000 or later. The majority of Hispanics in the United States are native-born US citizens. Of the 50.7 million people in 2010 who identified themselves as having Hispanic or Latino ancestry, only 37 percent (18.8 million) were immigrants.  In 2010, 73,293 refugees were admitted to the United States, marking a roughly 2 percent decrease from 2009 (74,602). Iraq, Burma, and Bhutan were the primary countries of nationality for refugees admitted to the United States in both 2009 and 2010, representing nearly 64 percent (47,072) of all refugees admitted in 2010.  For more information visit the link.

Migration Policy Institute: Frequently Requested Statistics on Immigrants and Immigration in the United States