iowaimmigration:
While the U.S. has historically and famously been a nation of immigrants, few know the details of how the U.S. brings in foreigners now. How many become citizens each year? Where do they live in the U.S.? Which country or origin leads for new American citizens? Here is what you need to know. How many foreigners become American citizens each year?In the last decade, an average of 700,000 people a year became naturalized citizens of the United States. That’s roughly one each year for every 500 U.S residents, or one every 79 seconds. In the 1990s, the annual average was 500,000, and in the 1980s it was 200,000. These may sound like large numbers, yet as share of the total population, this is a change from 0.1% of the population becoming naturalized citizens each year in the 1980s to 0.2% now. Where are they from originally?In recent years, the most new American citizens were from Mexico, followed by India, the Philippines and China. Since 1976, Asia has been the leading region of origin (before that it was Europe)Read More:  

iowaimmigration:
While the U.S. has historically and famously been a nation of immigrants, few know the details of how the U.S. brings in foreigners now. How many become citizens each year? Where do they live in the U.S.? Which country or origin leads for new American citizens? Here is what you need to know. How many foreigners become American citizens each year?In the last decade, an average of 700,000 people a year became naturalized citizens of the United States. That’s roughly one each year for every 500 U.S residents, or one every 79 seconds. In the 1990s, the annual average was 500,000, and in the 1980s it was 200,000. These may sound like large numbers, yet as share of the total population, this is a change from 0.1% of the population becoming naturalized citizens each year in the 1980s to 0.2% now. Where are they from originally?In recent years, the most new American citizens were from Mexico, followed by India, the Philippines and China. Since 1976, Asia has been the leading region of origin (before that it was Europe)Read More:  

How much do you know about U.S. immigrants?